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Cross Patch for Sept. 4, 2008

by Jo Cross

    Our nation is going down the chute as other major powers before us have gone.  The United States has never been a democracy in its true sense, and now it is rapidly losing its standing as a republic.  I wonder what Abraham Lincoln would say today, when our government is no longer of, for, or by the people, but government in the hands of lobbyists and large corporations.  As Mr. Lincoln knew our nation, he would grieve that it had perished from this earth.

    In recent years our nation’s corporations have sent jobs out of our country.  This deprives our workers who must seek lower paying jobs which leave them with a lower standard of living and a growing resentment of those who have done them dirt.  Our do-nothing Congress has encouraged this out sourcing for years, and some legislators have been at it longer than that.  Like the old song says, “a good man now-a-days is hard to find.”  There must be some good ones somewhere in Congress although their voices are difficult to hear.

    The rising power is China, which will take its place in the history of nations. China is a dictatorial government and consequently not always concerned with its people.  The farmers are not subsidized—or even noticed.  It seems cheaper to import food than to grow it; some farms have gone to weeds, some farmers are starving, and the dictatorial government grows.

    However, the Chinese technocrats are intelligent and accustomed to long-range planning.  Since they gained their technical knowledge, they have improved their capabilities over the years and now surpass the United States in many areas. China has wisely learned to supply cheap goods and equipment that will be bought by Americans.

    It will be interesting to watch China’s rise to power because her corporations are already strong.  The question is whether the government will be able to control them.

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